Remembering pogs

Remembering pogs! Do you remember pogs? They were those little round discs that were all the rage in the early 1990s. Everyone was playing with them, and they were even made into a television show!

Pogs were originally Hawaiian milk caps, but when they became popular in the mainland United States, they were made out of cardboard. The object of the game was to stack up your pogs and then use a heavier pog to knock over your opponent’s pogs. The player with the most pogs at the end of the game was the winner!

Pogs eventually fell out of popularity, but they’re still fondly remembered by those who grew up in that era. Do you have any memories of playing with pogs? Share them with us in the comments!

A little more about Milk Caps

Do you remember milk caps? Those little cardboard discs that came with milk cartons? They were ubiquitous in the 80s and 90s, and kids would collect them obsessively. But where did they come from?

It turns out, milk caps have a long and interesting history. They were first introduced in the 1970s as a way to promote milk consumption. The idea was that kids would be more likely to drink milk if they could collect the caps and trade them with their friends. And it worked! Milk consumption increased by 8% in the years after milk caps were introduced.

But milk caps didn’t just increase milk sales. They also became a cultural phenomenon. Kids all over the world collected them, traded them, and even played games with them. Milk caps were even featured in popular TV shows and movies like E.T. and The Breakfast Club.

Today, milk caps are still around, though they’re not as popular as they once were. You can still find them on milk cartons, and some kids still collect them. But milk caps will always be remembered as a classic part of childhood.

Want to chat about pogs? Join in on the conversation here.

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